quotes

  • (quote) repeat a passage from; “He quoted the Bible to her”
  • (quote) name the price of; “quote prices for cars”
  • Repeat a passage from (a work or author) or statement by (someone)
  • (quote) quotation mark: a punctuation mark used to attribute the enclosed text to someone else
  • Repeat or copy out (a group of words from a text or speech), typically with an indication that one is not the original author or speaker
  • Mention or refer to (someone or something) to provide evidence or authority for a statement, argument, or opinion

    heart

  • A hollow muscular organ that pumps the blood through the circulatory system by rhythmic contraction and dilation. In vertebrates there may be up to four chambers (as in humans), with two atria and two ventricles
  • The region of the chest above the heart
  • the locus of feelings and intuitions; “in your heart you know it is true”; “her story would melt your bosom”
  • the hollow muscular organ located behind the sternum and between the lungs; its rhythmic contractions move the blood through the body; “he stood still, his heart thumping wildly”
  • The heart regarded as the center of a person’s thoughts and emotions, esp. love or compassion
  • the courage to carry on; “he kept fighting on pure spunk”; “you haven’t got the heart for baseball”

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we heart it quotes – It's Not

It's Not the Big That Eat the Small…It's the Fast That Eat the Slow: How to Use Speed as a Competitive Tool in Business
It's Not the Big That Eat the Small...It's the Fast That Eat the Slow: How to Use Speed as a Competitive Tool in Business
Conventional wisdom once told us big companies are unbeatable… and eat smaller competitors for breakfast.
Not anymore. These days It’s Not the Big that Eat the Small… It’s the FAST that Eat the Slow!
Jason Jennings and Laurence Haughton discovered what separates today’s icons of speed from everybody else.
They asked questions like:
What is the difference between speed and haste?
Where does business go to spot trends before the competition?
How can leaders help people stop dreading high velocity and rediscover the thrill of deciding, acting and staying fast?
And studied the world’s fastest companies like:
H&M Europe’s fast fashion phenomenon now poised to threaten apparel stores in America.
AOL who gulped down Netscape and Time Warner in record time.
Charles Schwab the new dominant name in discount and on-line financial services.
The results are in this sensational book… a national bestseller, translated all over the globe and universally praised.
Would you like to make speed a competitive tool in your business? Here’s your roadmap!

The tortoise and the hare–not to mention a popular ’60s-era adage–warned us that Speed Kills. Not so fast, contend Jason Jennings and Laurence Haughton, international consultants who have worked together since 1976. In It’s Not the Big That Eat the Small… It’s the Fast That Eat the Slow, the two argue that only the swiftest of corporations will thrive in the 21st century. They then outline a program, based on best practices developed by contemporary speedsters like Charles Schwab and AOL that readers can work into their own businesses by similarly focusing on “commerce, resource deployment, and people.” Its four parts examine ways to create environments that anticipate the future, reassess operations and personnel and make appropriate adjustments whenever necessary, launch a “crusade” while “staying beneath the radar,” and maintain velocity through institutionalization and close customer relationships. “This book will show you how to think and move faster than your competition,” they write, adding that “being faster doesn’t mean being out of breath. It means being smarter.” Many of their suggestions will be familiar to those who follow the business of business improvement, but the singular (and quite convincing) context to which Jennings and Haughton now apply them help make this book unique. –Howard Rothman

'We Kissed'

'We Kissed'
Cut this out of a magazine ages ago and stuck it to my wall. I think I just liked how simple but exciting those two words seemed.

It would bE good

It would bE good
We’ll grow old together … N hope we’ll die together

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Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation
With wisdom, compassion, and gentle humor, Parker J. Palmer invites us to listen to the inner teacher and follow its leadings toward a sense of meaning and purpose. Telling stories from his own life and the lives of others who have made a difference, he shares insights gained from darkness and depression as well as fulfillment and joy, illuminating a pathway toward vocation for all who seek the true calling of their lives.

The old Quaker adage, “Let your life speak,” spoke to author Parker J. Palmer when he was in his early 30s. It summoned him to a higher purpose, so he decided that henceforth he would live a nobler life. “I lined up the most elevated ideals I could find and set out to achieve them,” he writes. “The results were rarely admirable, often laughable, and sometimes grotesque…. I had simply found a ‘noble’ way of living a life that was not my own, a life spent imitating heroes instead of listening to my heart.”
Thirty years later, Palmer now understands that learning to let his life speak means “living the life that wants to live in me.” It involves creating the kind of quiet, trusting conditions that allow a soul to speak its truth. It also means tuning out the noisy preconceived ideas about what a vocation should and shouldn’t be so that we can better hear the call of our wild souls. There are no how-to formulas in this extremely unpretentious and well-written book, just fireside wisdom from an elder who is willing to share his mistakes and stories as he learned to live a life worth speaking about. –Gail Hudson